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Date: 2016
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1196241
Description: The study of collective behaviour aims to understand how individual-level behaviours can lead to complex group-level patterns. Collective behaviour has primarily been studied in animal groups such as ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2016
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1193957
Description: Several recent studies hint at shared patterns in decision-making between taxonomically distant organisms, yet few studies demonstrate and dissect mechanisms of decision-making in simpler organisms. W ... More
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Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2015
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1071746
Description: Decision making is a necessary process for most organisms, even for the majority of known life forms: those without a brain or neurons. The goal of this review is to highlight research dedicated to un ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2013
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1132908
Description: Many organisms avoid previously exploited patches to increase their foraging efficiency. Such avoidance behavior either requires systematic search, memorizing which patches have been visited, the depo ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2012
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1132866
Description: The mechanisms by which self-organized systems like an ant colony reach collective decisions are poorly understood. Models explaining how trail-laying ants select the best food source and adapt to cha ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2012
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1132898
Description: Spatial memory enhances an organism's navigational ability. Memory typically resides within the brain, but what if an organism has no brain? We show that the brainless slime mold Physarum polycephalum ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
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