Macquarie University, Sydney Macquarie University ResearchOnline

Showing items 1 - 6 of 6.

Add to Quick Collection   All 6 Results

  • First
  • Previous
  • 1
  • Next
  • Last
Sort:
 Add All Items to Quick Collection
Date: 2017
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1235820
Description: Pregnancy is a challenging period for egg laying squamates. Carrying eggs can encumber females and decrease their locomotor performance, potentially increasing their risk of predation. Pregnant female ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2015
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1054652
Description: Territorial behaviour, whereby dominant animals gain priority access to critical resources, is widespread in some animal lineages, but rare in others. Theory suggests that territoriality will evolve o ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2013
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/228822
Description: Snakes have traditionally been viewed as solitary, asocial animals whose habitat use is driven by temperature, prey and predators. However, recent studies suggest that snake spatial ecology may also b ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2009
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/137708
Description: Understanding what constrains signalling and maintains signal honesty is a central theme in animal communication. Clear cases of dishonest signalling, and the conditions under which they are used, rep ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2006
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/137720
Description: Vertebrates that destroy or disturb habitats used by other animals may influence habitat selection by sympatric taxa. In south-east Australian forests, superb lyrebirds (Menura novaehollandiae) displa ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2005
Subject Keyword: 060200 Ecology
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/137124
Description: Previous studies have suggested that most small Australian elapid snakes are nocturnal and rarely bask in the open because of the risk of predation by diurnal predatory birds. Because the physiology a ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
  • First
  • Previous
  • 1
  • Next
  • Last