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Authors: Alsop, Benjamin
Date: 2018
Language: eng
Resource Type: Thesis MRes
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1269931
Description: Empirical thesis.
Full Text: Full Text
Authors: Gerdes, Mitchell
Date: 2017
Language: eng
Resource Type: Thesis MRes
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1261220
Description: Theoretical thesis.
Full Text: Full Text
Date: 2017
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1247910
Description: The Truong Son Fold Belt (TSFB) is characterised by Late Carboniferous-Late Triassic metamorphic, volcanic and plutonic rocks, the product of accretion of the Indochina Terrane onto the South China Te ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2015
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1063601
Description: The geochemical signatures of "adakites" are usually attributed to high-pressure (≥50 km) partial melting of mafic rocks, and accordingly the occurrence of adakitic magmas in continental settings is f ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2014
Language: eng
Resource Type: Thesis PhD
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1138381
Description: "A thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) at Macquarie University".
Full Text: Full Text
Date: 2013
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/271822
Description: Coeval potassic adakite-like and shoshonitic felsic intrusions in the westernYunnan province of SWChina are spatially and temporally associated with Eocene-Oligocene shoshonitic mafic volcanic rocks. ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2012
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/187023
Description: Adakite was originally defined as a specific type of magmatic rock derived from melting of subducted oceanic plates (Defant, M.J., Drummond, M.S., 1990. Derivation of some modern arc magmas by melting ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2011
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/165026
Description: The Miocene-aged Yungay and Fortaleza ignimbrites (YFI), 9 degrees S. Cordillera Blanca, Peru, share geochemical affinities typical of Phanerozoic adakite-like rocks and Archaean tonalite-trondhjemite ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2011
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/150656
Description: Piston-cylinder experiments on a Pleistocene adakite from Mindanao in the Philippines have been used to establish near-liquidus and sub-liquidus phase relationships relevant to conditions in the East ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2009
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/97840
Description: Major, trace, and rare earth element compositions of both tonalite–trondhjemite–granodiorite (TTG) and modern adakite-like magmas are typically used in conjunction with batch melting experiments and m ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2009
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/128711
Description: Rising as “the roof of the world” the Tibetan plateau is now underlain with the thickest continental crust on Earth. How and when was this crust formed, which would have exerted pivotal controls to th ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2008
Subject Keyword: 040300 Geology
Language: eng
Resource Type: book chapter
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/191175
Description: The distribution of lamprophyre-hosted Neoarchean diamond deposits in the southem Superior Province, Canada, corresponds to that of coeval giant(> 100 tAu) examples of "orogenic" gold deposits, which ... More
Date: 2005
Subject Keyword: 040200 Geochemistry
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/31137
Description: Adakites have a distinct chemistry that links them to melting of a mafic source at high pressure. They have been attributed to melting of subducted oceanic crust or melting of the mafic crustal roots ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
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