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Date: 2009
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/141002
Description: We investigated the effects of human disturbance and attitudes on the density of the tree agama Acanthocercus atricollis atricollis in a densely populated rural settlement in South Africa. In this env ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2008
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/137101
Description: In many animals females mate with multiple males during a single breeding season (polyandry), but the benefits of this mating system remain poorly understood. One hypothesis is that polyandry ensures ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2006
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/137720
Description: Vertebrates that destroy or disturb habitats used by other animals may influence habitat selection by sympatric taxa. In south-east Australian forests, superb lyrebirds (Menura novaehollandiae) displa ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2006
Subject Keyword: 060800 Zoology | 060200 Ecology
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/137110
Description: Traditionally, studies of intrasexual selection have focused on single traits that are more exaggerated in males. Relatively little is known about systems in which traits are larger in females or the ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2006
Subject Keyword: 060800 Zoology | 060200 Ecology
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/137104
Description: Understanding the role of multiple colour signals during sexual signalling is a central theme in animal communication. We quantified the role of multiple colour signals (including ultraviolet, UV), me ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2005
Subject Keyword: 060200 Ecology
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/137124
Description: Previous studies have suggested that most small Australian elapid snakes are nocturnal and rarely bask in the open because of the risk of predation by diurnal predatory birds. Because the physiology a ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
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